PROGRAM

Daoist Conference – 2-Day Online Event (download conference program PDF)

daoist conference

To further realize Master Zhou’s mission to promote cross-cultural East and West understanding, this inaugural conference brings people together to inform, discuss, and deepen the understanding of Daoism, not only as a religious practice but as a way of life. Join us, via Zoom, on August 7 -8, 2021

The event will feature presentations from esteemed Daoist practitioners on a variety of topics related to the Dao De Jing, including Daoist morning and evening altar scriptures chanting, the earliest precepts of the Nine Practices of the Daoist Way of Life, and the classical Daoist meditation in Daoist practice. Master Zhou will also share his personal journey of becoming a Daoist priest.

This event would not be possible without the generosity of several individuals and organizations who support our work, including the students of the Daoist Benevolent Association and Daoist Gate.

All are welcome!


PROGRAM and EVENT DETAILS (download as a PDF)

Saturday, August 7, 2021, 9:00 AM (New York EST)
Join Online Meeting: ZOOM
Meeting ID: 945 4194 8410
Passcode: 670631

9:00 AM (EST) Zoom link opens
9:15 AM – Welcome
9:30 AM – Panel 1 – Understanding the Rituals of Morning and Evening Chanting in Daoist Temples, Sander Vink, Daoist Scripture Translator, Toronto.
10:30 AM –  Q&A

Saturday, August 7, 2021, 2:00 PM (New York EST)
Join Online Meeting: ZOOM
Meeting ID: 945 4194 8410
Passcode: 670631

2:00 PM (EST) Zoom link opens
2:15 PM – Welcome
2:30 PM – Panel 2 – Daoist Cultivation According to Nine Practices, Louis Komjathy 康思奇, Ph.D., CSO, Daoist Foundation 道教基金會, Chicago
3:30 PM –  Q&A
4:00 PM – Closing


Sunday, August 8, 2021, 9:00 AM (New York EST)
Join Online Meeting: ZOOM
Meeting ID: 945 4194 8410
Passcode: 670631

9:00 AM (EST) – Zoom link opens
9:15 AM – Welcome
9:30 AM – Panel 3 – Classical Daoist Meditation, Larson di Fiori, Assistant Professor in Religious Studies and Contemplative Studies at Brown University
10:30 AM –  Q&A

Sunday, August 8, 2021, 2:00 PM (New York EST)
Join Online Meeting: ZOOM
Meeting ID: 945 4194 8410
Passcode: 670631

2:00 PM (EST) Zoom link opens
2:15 PM – Welcome
2:30 PM – Panel 4 – A Personal Reflection: Being A Daoist and the Practical Wisdom to Help Navigate Life by Master Zhou
3:30 PM –  Q&A
4:00 PM – Closing



Sander Vink is a translator of Daoist texts with a special interest in the 早晚壇功課經 (Zaowantan Gongkejing), or in English, the Morning and Evening Recitations of Merit that are performed daily by every temple dwelling Daoist in China and communities of Daoist practitioners all over
the world.

Panel 1
Undestanding the Rituals of Morning and Evening Chanting
in Daoist Temples

Saturday, August 7, 2021, 9:00 AM (New York EST)
Join Online Meeting: ZOOM
Meeting ID: 945 4194 8410
Passcode: 670631


9:00 AM (EST) Zoom link opens
9:15 AM – Welcome
9:30 AM – PANEL 1 – Understanding the Rituals of Morning and Evening Chanting in Daoist Temples by Sander Vink
10:30 AM – Q&A


Imagine that you are a Daoist nun, or monk or priest, living in a temple on a mountaintop in China. What is the first thing you do when you get up when it gets light at five o’clock in the morning or earlier? You hurry (carefully) to the main hall of the temple, you drape your red or yellow cloak over your standard blue robe, and wait until the percussion starts to begin reciting the daily Daoist liturgy, – as you do every morning and every evening of every day that you live in the temple or monastery. Not too much is known or published about this practice in the West, although a few translations have become available in Western languages more recently, it forms the core of the daily practice in Daoist temple communities. The Morning and Evening Recitations of Merit is a collection of short texts divided into two parts, one to be recited in the morning, the other in the evening. I will give an introduction about the how, who, and why of reciting texts in a religious Daoist setting, and follow that up with a concise overview of the content of the Morning and Evening Recitation’s constituent parts. The compound nature of the text, combining incantations, hymns of praise, refuges, and vows, and scriptures with more philosophical or doctrinal content, make the Morning and Evening Recitations of Merit also a great way to get a quick introduction into different types of Daoist religious scripture.




Louis Komjathy 康思奇, Ph.D., CSO
Daoist Foundation 道教基金會
(Religious Studies; Boston University) is a leading Daoist scholar-practitioner and translator of Daoist literature. An ordained Daoist priest (26th generation) of the Huàshān 華山 (Mount Hua) lineage of Quánzhēn 全眞 (Complete Perfection) Daoism, he is the founding Co-director and senior teacher of the Daoist Foundation 道教基金會, a US-based non-profit educational and religious organization dedicated to fostering authentic Daoist study and practice and to preserving and transmitting traditional Daoist culture. He researches and has published extensively in Contemplative Studies, Daoist Studies, and Religious Studies, including The Way of Complete Perfection (State University of New York Press, 2013), The Daoist Tradition (Bloomsbury Academic, 2013), and Taming the Wild Horse (Columbia University Press, 2017). He also is the featured Daoist scholar-practitioner in Dream Trippers (University of Chicago Press, 2017). He lives in semi-seclusion on the Northshore of Chicago, Illinois.


Panel 2
Daoist Cultivation According to the Nine Practices

Saturday, August 7, 2021, 2:00 PM (New York EST)
Join Online Meeting: ZOOM
Meeting ID: 945 4194 8410
Passcode: 670631


2:00 PM (EST) Zoom link opens
2:15 PM – Welcome
2:30 PM – PANEL 2 – Daoist Cultivation According to the Nine Practices
by Louis Komjathy
3:30 PM – Q&A


The Nine Practices (jiǔxíng 九行) are the earliest known Daoist precepts (dàojiè 道戒), that is, guidelines for a Daoist way of life. Derived from the Dàodé jīng 道德經 (Scripture on the Dao and Inner Power), these nine Daoist principles are associated with the early Tiānshī 天師 (Celestial Masters) movement and possibly date to around the early third century CE. In this talk, Dr. Komjathy will draw attention to the ways in which the Nine Practices offer important insights into classical and foundational Daoist views, values, and qualities, ones that may be explored as both the root and fruition of dedicated Daoist practice-realization. He will specifically emphasize an applied approach to scripture study in which the Nine Practices may inform one’s reading of the Dàodé jīng, and vice versa. In the process, he will not only provide guidance on how to cultivate such Daoist approaches and commitments, but also reveal important connective strands throughout the Daoist tradition as a whole.



Larson Di Fiori, Ph.D. is a visiting assistant professor inReligious Studies and Contemplative Studies at Brown University.

Panel 3
Classical Daoist Meditation

Sunday, August 8, 2021, 9:00 AM (New York EST)
Join Online Meeting: ZOOM
Meeting ID: 945 4194 8410
Passcode: 670631

9:00 AM (EST) Zoom link opens
9:15 AM – Welcome
9:30 AM – PANEL 3- Classical Daoist Meditation
by Larson Di Fiori
10:30 PM – Q&A


Texts like the Daode jing and the Zhuangzi are famed for their striking ideas, paradoxical language, and profound imagery, but they also show evidence of being formed around a contemplative practice tradition involving a form of quietistic meditation. Reframing our understanding of this earliest period of “Classical Daoism” around contemplative practice rather than exclusively written texts and intellectual debates can give us a better sense of how the tradition developed and what other texts were connected with or influenced by it. Centering on the groundbreaking research of Harold Roth, this talk will explore not just what Classical Daoists thought, but what they did to experience the kinds of “naturalness,” “effortless action,” and “free and easy wanderingdepicted in their texts.





Master Zhou Xuan Yun, at age 13, was sent to live on Wudang Mountain, where he was a student and later an instructor of Taiji, Kung Fu, and Qi Gong. Living at the Daoist Association Martial Arts Academy, in the Purple Cloud Temple, he was accepted into the 24th generation on the Wudang Long Men (Lóng ménpài 龙门派) lineage. At the age of 16, he took the vows to become a Daoist Monk and began his study of Daoist philosophy and religious practices. He was trained in ritual arts, chanting, divination, and internal alchemy. Master Zhou is a formally recognized disciple of Master Li Guang Fu 李光富, the Chairman of the Chinese Taoist Association (中国道教协会会长). Recently, Master Zhou moved to Francestown, New Hampshire, where he built a Daoist Center.


Panel 4
A Personal Reflection: Being A Daoist and the Practical Wisdom to Help Navigate Life

Sunday, AUGUST 8, 2021, 2:00 PM (New York EST)
Join Online Meeting: ZOOM
Meeting ID: 945 4194 8410
Passcode: 670631


2:00 PM (EST) Zoom link opens
2:15 PM – Welcome
2:30 PM – PANEL 3- A Personal Reflection, by Master Zhou Xuan Yun
3:30 PM – Q&A
4:00 PM – CLOSING


Daoism is a special religion. In many ways, it resembles an academy of life sciences in its search for methods to solve our lives’ problems. Unlike some religions, Daoism does not encourage people to escape from society or provide people with a lot of spiritual chicken soup. Rather, Daoism understands that our character largely determines our destiny. If we are unsatisfied with our lives, we must change our perspective. Only in this way will our life trajectory change. My mission is to help people understand Daoism and how people can benefit from Daoism culture. In this talk, I will share my personal stories as a disciple in the temples of Wudang and my years as a wandering monk all over China, and the practical lessons learned that still guide my life as a Daoist.